Nicole Morin

Nicole Louise Morin was born on 1st April, 1977 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Her parents were Arthur (Art) and Jeanette Morin, who had been married for 12 years. She was their only child.

In July 1985, Nicole was living with her mother in a 20th-floor penthouse in the Etobicoke borough of Toronto. Arthur, her father, was living in Mississauga. Nicole was on summer holiday from Wellesworth Junior School, where she attended the third grade.

30th July, 1985, at approximately 10:30am, Nicole went to the lobby of her building to collect the mail. She then returned to the apartment to get ready to go swimming with a friend. Before leaving the apartment, she spoke to her friend over intercom saying that Nicole would meet her friend in the lobby shortly.

Nicole left her apartment that day wearing a peach coloured bathing suit, a green hairband, and red canvas shoes. She carried a white plastic bag containing a white T-shirt, green and white shorts, suntan lotion, a hairbrush, a peach-coloured blanket and a purple beach towel.

15 minutes after Nicole had left the apartment to meet her friend, Nicole’s friend buzzed her apartment to ask why she hadn’t met her yet. Jeanette was busy with small children, as she ran a day-care class in her apartment, so she just assumed that Nicole had gone to the pool already or was playing with other children at the back of the complex. Nicole Morin was not reported missing until 3pm that day.

The police initially actively searched and canvassed the entire 429-apartent complex where Nicole lived, as-well as setting up roadblocks around the building and using vehicles with public addressing systems to alert the neighbourhood of Nicole’s disappearance. The police went door to door, even entering apartments if no one answered the door. A woman in the building did identify Nicole from a photograph, which led police to determine that Nicole had used the elevator and reached the lobby on that day. After that, no further sightings have ever been recorded.

Nicole Morin

The next day, mounted horsemen, marine units, helicopters and foot patrol started to comb the area next to Highway 27, which was in the area surrounding the complex. Tracking dogs were also used in the building’s underground garages, utility rooms, storage units and pump rooms.

One neighbour did recall seeing an unknown blonde women with a notebook, on Nicole’s hallway, about 45 minutes before Nicole disappeared. The police did want to speak to her as a witness, but she has never been identified nor has anyone come forward claiming to be this women.

Over 900 residents joined the search for Nicole, and the Toronto Crime Stoppers took on the disappearance as their first big case. They posted a $1,000 reward, printed pictures and created a video re-enactment of Nicole’s last known moves before she went missing, which aired on the TV. 3,000 copies of a sketch of Nicole was commissioned by the police was distributed to police departments, local shops, and post offices.

The search for Nicole Morin was the biggest search for a missing person by the Toronto Police Department. They even formed a 20 member task force which remained active for 9 months. 25,000 man hours were spent following up leads.

By November 1985, the police had interviewed and questioned around 6,000 suspects, including sex offenders. The first year of the investigation cost approximately $1.8 million. The police issued an $100,000 reward for Nicole’s safe return, and the reward still stands to this day.

Police have cleared all of Nicole’s family and friends from suspicion. The police did find an unexplained note in Nicole’s apartment that Nicole, herself, had written in pencil months earlier. The note simply read: “I’m going to disappear”.

Arthur Morin raised funds and hired a private investigator to search for his daughter. Arthur also left his job and searched for clues for his daughter across Canada and the United States. Arthur did move back in with Jeanette after Nicole’s disappearance, but the couple divorced in 1987.Jeanette consulted with a psychic in Calgary in her effort to find Nicole.

Despite the thousands of leads and the hundreds of hours put into this investigation, Nicole has never been found.

In 2004, researches for a Belgian organisation known as the Fondation Princesses de Croÿ et Massimo Lancellotti, announced that they had provisionally matched Nicole’s photographs to photos on a Dutch website that advocates for sexually abused children. Using biometrical analysis, the researches have said that there is a strong resemblance between Nicole and a child in a paedophile network that is based in Zandvoort, Netherlands. It is still unknown if the child in the paedophile network is Nicole.

Nicole Morin’s case is now considered cold by the Toronto Police Department, however the police work with missing children networks to keep the case in the public eye.

Sadly, Jeanette died in 2007 without knowing what happened to Nicole. Arthur is reportedly still alive and living in the Etobicoke area, where Nicole vanished from 35 years ago.

This case raises a lot of questions – particularly, how does a child get kidnapped or taken from an apartment complex’s lobby without anyone seeing anything? Secondly, is the blonde women with the notebook connected to Nicole’s disappearance? She was around 45 minutes before Nicole went missing, and is unknown to the residents in the apartments – to me, that sounds highly suspicious. Was Nicole in the building the whole time, or did someone take her and leave? Considering that Nicole went missing at around 11am, and wasn’t reported missing until 3pm, that gives a window of 4 hours in which Nicole could have been taken.

Sadly, it is likely that we will never know what happened to Nicole on that day. Police are no closer to finding her now then they were 35 years ago. So unless someone comes forward and tells the truth, or gives some indication as to what happened, Nicole’s case will remain unsolved.

Aged enhanced picture of Nicole Louise Morin

Tags:

True crime, missing, unsolved, children, Canada

Published by

Kelly

I write my own blog about missing people and unsolved cases across the world, hoping one day to bring them justice.

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